Special Section on Development, Challenges, and Opportunities of Positron Emission Tomography

Initial performance studies of a wearable brain positron emission tomography camera based on autonomous thin-film digital Geiger avalanche photodiode arrays

[+] Author Affiliations
Charles R. Schmidtlein, Ida Häggström, John L. Humm

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, 1250 First Avenue, New York, New York 10065, United States

James N. Turner

State University of New York at Binghamton, Department of Small Scale Systems, Vestal Parkway East, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, New York 13902, United States

Michael O. Thompson

Cornell University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 328 Bard Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853-1501, United States

Krishna C. Mandal

University of South Carolina, Department of Electrical Engineering, Main Street, Swearingen Engineering Building 301, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, United States

Jiahan Zhang, David H. Feiglin

State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Syracuse, New York 13210, United States

Andrzej Krol

State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Syracuse, New York 13210, United States

State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Department of Pharmacology, 750 E. Adams Street, Syracuse, New York 13210, United States

J. Med. Imag. 4(1), 011003 (Nov 22, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JMI.4.1.011003
History: Received April 1, 2016; Accepted October 20, 2016
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Abstract.  Using analytical and Monte Carlo modeling, we explored performance of a lightweight wearable helmet-shaped brain positron emission tomography (PET), or BET camera, based on thin-film digital Geiger avalanche photodiode arrays with Lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) or LaBr3 scintillators for imaging in vivo human brain function of freely moving and acting subjects. We investigated a spherical cap BET and cylindrical brain PET (CYL) geometries with 250-mm diameter. We also considered a clinical whole-body (WB) LYSO PET/CT scanner. The simulated energy resolutions were 10.8% (LYSO) and 3.3% (LaBr3), and the coincidence window was set at 2 ns. The brain was simulated as a water sphere of uniform F-18 activity with a radius of 100 mm. We found that BET achieved >40% better noise equivalent count (NEC) performance relative to the CYL and >800% than WB. For 10-mm-thick LaBr3 equivalent mass systems, LYSO (7-mm thick) had 40% higher NEC than LaBr3. We found that 1×1×3  mm scintillator crystals achieved 1.1  mm full-width-half-maximum spatial resolution without parallax errors. Additionally, our simulations showed that LYSO generally outperformed LaBr3 for NEC unless the timing resolution for LaBr3 was considerably smaller than that presently used for LYSO, i.e., well below 300 ps.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Charles R. Schmidtlein ; James N. Turner ; Michael O. Thompson ; Krishna C. Mandal ; Ida Häggström, et al.
"Initial performance studies of a wearable brain positron emission tomography camera based on autonomous thin-film digital Geiger avalanche photodiode arrays", J. Med. Imag. 4(1), 011003 (Nov 22, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMI.4.1.011003


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