Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging

Quantitative analysis of hypertrophic myocardium using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Nicholas Tran

University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Physics Research Laboratory, 185 Berry Street, Ste 350, San Francisco, United States

Archontis Giannakidis

Royal Brompton Hospital, Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Sydney Street, London SW3 6NP, United Kingdom

National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Sydney Street, London SW3 6NP, United Kingdom

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Structural Biology and Imaging Department, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, United States

Grant T. Gullberg

University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Physics Research Laboratory, 185 Berry Street, Ste 350, San Francisco, United States

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Structural Biology and Imaging Department, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, United States

University of California, Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, 1700 4th Street, San Francisco, United States

Youngho Seo

University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Physics Research Laboratory, 185 Berry Street, Ste 350, San Francisco, United States

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Structural Biology and Imaging Department, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California, United States

University of California, Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, 1700 4th Street, San Francisco, United States

University of California, Department of Radiation Oncology, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, United States

J. Med. Imag. 3(4), 046001 (Nov 03, 2016). doi:10.1117/1.JMI.3.4.046001
History: Received June 13, 2016; Accepted September 28, 2016
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Abstract.  Systemic hypertension is a causative factor in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). This study is motivated by the potential to reverse or manage the dysfunction associated with structural remodeling of the myocardium in this pathology. Using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, we present an analysis of myocardial fiber and laminar sheet orientation in ex vivo hypertrophic (6 SHR) and normal (5 WKY) rat hearts using the covariance of the diffusion tensor. First, an atlas of normal cardiac microstructure was formed using the WKY b0 images. Then, the SHR and WKY b0 hearts were registered to the atlas. The acquired deformation fields were applied to the SHR and WKY heart tensor fields followed by the preservation of principal direction (PPD) reorientation strategy. A mean tensor field was then formed from the registered WKY tensor images. Calculating the covariance of the registered tensor images about this mean for each heart, the hypertrophic myocardium exhibited significantly increased myocardial fiber derangement (p=0.017) with a mean dispersion of 38.7 deg, and an increased dispersion of the laminar sheet normal (p=0.030) of 54.8 deg compared with 34.8 deg and 51.8 deg, respectively, in the normal hearts. Results demonstrate significantly altered myocardial fiber and laminar sheet structure in rats with hypertensive LVH.

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© 2016 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Nicholas Tran ; Archontis Giannakidis ; Grant T. Gullberg and Youngho Seo
"Quantitative analysis of hypertrophic myocardium using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging", J. Med. Imag. 3(4), 046001 (Nov 03, 2016). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMI.3.4.046001


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