Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging

Correlations between quantitative fat–water magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in human subcutaneous white adipose tissue

[+] Author Affiliations
Aliya Gifford

Vanderbilt University, Institute of Imaging Science, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North, AA-1105, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States

Vanderbilt University, Chemical and Physical Biology Program, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North, AA 3105, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States

Ronald C. Walker

Tennessee Valley VA Healthcare, Department of Medical Imaging, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North, CCC-1121, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North, CCC-1121, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States

Theodore F. Towse

Vanderbilt University, Institute of Imaging Science, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North, AA-1105, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2201 Children's Way #1014, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States

E. Brian Welch

Vanderbilt University, Institute of Imaging Science, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North, AA-1105, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States

Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North, CCC-1121, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, United States

J. Med. Imag. 2(4), 046001 (Dec 18, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JMI.2.4.046001
History: Received June 15, 2015; Accepted November 18, 2015
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Abstract.  Beyond estimation of depot volumes, quantitative analysis of adipose tissue properties could improve understanding of how adipose tissue correlates with metabolic risk factors. We investigated whether the fat signal fraction (FSF) derived from quantitative fat–water magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at 3.0 T correlates to CT Hounsfield units (HU) of the same tissue. These measures were acquired in the subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT) at the umbilical level of 21 healthy adult subjects. A moderate correlation exists between MRI- and CT-derived WAT values for all subjects, R2=0.54, p<0.0001, with a slope of 2.6, (95% CI [3.3,1.8]), indicating that a decrease of 1 HU equals a mean increase of 0.38% FSF. We demonstrate that FSF estimates obtained using quantitative fat–water MRI techniques correlate with CT HU values in subcutaneous WAT, and therefore, MRI-based FSF could be used as an alternative to CT HU for assessing metabolic risk factors.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Aliya Gifford ; Ronald C. Walker ; Theodore F. Towse and E. Brian Welch
"Correlations between quantitative fat–water magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in human subcutaneous white adipose tissue", J. Med. Imag. 2(4), 046001 (Dec 18, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMI.2.4.046001


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