Special Section on Medical Image Perception and Observer Performance

Radiologists remember mountains better than radiographs, or do they?

[+] Author Affiliations
Karla K. Evans

The University of York, Department of Psychology, Heslington, York YO105DD, United Kingdom

Edith M. Marom, Myrna C. B. Godoy, Tara Sagebiel, Sonia Betancourt Cuellar, Charles Tian, Tamara Miner Haygood

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1475, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030, United States

Diana Palacio

The University of Arizona, College of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, 1501 North Cambell Avenue, Tucson, Arizona 85724-5067, United States

Mark McEntee, Patrick C. Brennan

University of Sydney, Medical Image Optimisation and Perception Group, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences (C42), Room M221, Cumberland Campus, Sydney NSW 2141, Australia

J. Med. Imag. 3(1), 011005 (Nov 03, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.011005
History: Received July 9, 2015; Accepted September 25, 2015
Text Size: A A A

Abstract.  Expertise with encoding material has been shown to aid long-term memory for that material. It is not clear how relevant this expertise is for image memorability (e.g., radiologists’ memory for radiographs), and how robust over time. In two studies, we tested scene memory using a standard long-term memory paradigm. One compared the performance of radiologists to naïve observers on two image sets, chest radiographs and everyday scenes, and the other radiologists’ memory with immediate as opposed to delayed recognition tests using musculoskeletal radiographs and forest scenes. Radiologists’ memory was better than novices for images of expertise but no different for everyday scenes. With the heterogeneity of image sets equated, radiologists’ expertise with radiographs afforded them better memory for the musculoskeletal radiographs than forest scenes. Enhanced memory for images of expertise disappeared over time, resulting in chance level performance for both image sets after weeks of delay. Expertise with the material is important for visual memorability but not to the same extent as idiosyncratic detail and variability of the image set. Similar memory decline with time for images of expertise as for everyday scenes further suggests that extended familiarity with an image is not a robust factor for visual memorability.

Figures in this Article
© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Karla K. Evans ; Edith M. Marom ; Myrna C. B. Godoy ; Diana Palacio ; Tara Sagebiel, et al.
"Radiologists remember mountains better than radiographs, or do they?", J. Med. Imag. 3(1), 011005 (Nov 03, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMI.3.1.011005


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
A new e-learning platform for radiology education (RadEd). Comput Methods Programs Biomed 2016;126():63-75.
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.