Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging

Fiber orientation measurements by diffusion tensor imaging improve hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intramyocellular lipids in human leg muscles

[+] Author Affiliations
Sunil K. Valaparla, Geoffrey D. Clarke

University of Texas Health Science Center, Research Imaging Institute, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229-3900, United States

University of Texas Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229-3900, United States

Feng Gao

University of Texas Health Science Center, Research Imaging Institute, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229-3900, United States

Giuseppe Daniele

University of Texas Health Science Center, Department of Medicine, Diabetes Division, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229-3900, United States

University of Pisa, Department of Endocrinology, Via Paradisa 2, Pisa 56124, Italy

Muhammad Abdul-Ghani

University of Texas Health Science Center, Department of Medicine, Diabetes Division, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229-3900, United States

J. Med. Imag. 2(2), 026002 (Jun 09, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JMI.2.2.026002
History: Received January 21, 2015; Accepted May 6, 2015
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Abstract.  Twelve healthy subjects underwent hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H1-MRS) acquisition (15×15×15mm3), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with a b-value of 600smm2, and fat-water magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using the Dixon method. Subject-specific muscle fiber orientation, derived from DTI, was used to estimate the lipid proton spectral chemical shift. Pennation angles were measured as 23.78 deg in vastus lateralis (VL), 17.06 deg in soleus (SO), and 8.49 deg in tibialis anterior (TA) resulting in a chemical shift between extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) of 0.15, 0.17, and 0.19 ppm, respectively. IMCL concentrations were 8.66±1.24mmolkg1, 6.12±0.77mmolkg1, and 2.33±0.19mmolkg1 in SO, VL, and TA, respectively. Significant differences were observed in IMCL and EMCL pairwise comparisons in SO, VL, and TA (p<0.05). Strong correlations were observed between total fat fractions from H1-MRS and Dixon MRI for VL (r=0.794), SO (r=0.655), and TA (r=0.897). Bland-Altman analysis between fat fractions (FFMRS and FFMRI) showed good agreement with small limits of agreement (LoA): bias=0.21% (LoA: 1.12% to 0.69%) in VL, bias=0.025% (LoA: 1.28% to 1.33%) in SO, and bias=0.13% (LoA: 0.74% to 0.47%) in TA. The results of this study demonstrate the variation in muscle fiber orientation and lipid concentrations in these three skeletal muscle types.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Sunil K. Valaparla ; Feng Gao ; Giuseppe Daniele ; Muhammad Abdul-Ghani and Geoffrey D. Clarke
"Fiber orientation measurements by diffusion tensor imaging improve hydrogen-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intramyocellular lipids in human leg muscles", J. Med. Imag. 2(2), 026002 (Jun 09, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMI.2.2.026002


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