Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment

Does preference influence performance when reading different sizes of cranial computed tomography?

[+] Author Affiliations
Antje C. Venjakob

Technische Universität Berlin, Department of Psychology and Ergonomics, Chair of Human-Machine Systems, Marchstrasse 23, Berlin 10587, Germany

Tim Marnitz

Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin—Campus Virchow Klinikum, Klinik für Strahlenheilkunde, Mittelallee 3, Berlin 13353, Germany

Lavier Gomes

Westmead Hospital, Corner of Darcy Road & Bridge Street, Westmead, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia

Claudia R. Mello-Thoms

University of Sydney, Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, 94 Mallet Street, Level 2, Room 204, Sydney, NSW 2150, Australia

University of Pittsburgh, Department of Biomedical Informatics, 5607 Baum Boulevard, Room 423, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15206-3701, United States

J. Med. Imag. 1(3), 035503 (Dec 22, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JMI.1.3.035503
History: Received September 15, 2014; Accepted November 17, 2014
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Abstract.  Radiology practice is based on the implicit assumption that the preference for a particular presentation mode goes hand in hand with superior performance. The present experiment tests this assumption in what pertains to image size. Forty-three radiologists were asked to identify intracranial hemorrhages on 20 cranial computed tomography scans in two image sizes, 14×14 and 28×28cm. They were asked to indicate which size they preferred and subsequently rated each size on a continuous scale in terms of how much they liked them. The results show no correlation between the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic figure of merit and preference rated on a continuous scale (large image: r=0.14, p=0.38; small images: r=0.14, p=0.39). Similarly, there was no significant correlation between the time a radiologist took to read a case and preference rated on the continuous scale (large image: r=0.07, p=0.64; small images: r=0.04, p=0.80). When dividing radiologists into two groups according to their size preference, there was no significant difference in performance between groups with regard to either large or small images. The results suggest that the preference for an image size and performance with regard to it are not related.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Antje C. Venjakob ; Tim Marnitz ; Lavier Gomes and Claudia R. Mello-Thoms
"Does preference influence performance when reading different sizes of cranial computed tomography?", J. Med. Imag. 1(3), 035503 (Dec 22, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMI.1.3.035503


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